Category Archives: Programme

Inclusion on Board

Is chess the ultimate inclusive sport? Physical differences due to age and sex do not prevent us from competing with each other. Even physical impairments can be overcome. A chess set that enables visually impaired players to recognize the position of the pieces was invented in London as early as 1848. Theodore Tylor, who was among England´s leading players in the 1930s and drew Alekhine and Capablanca in regular games, was nearly blind. Chris Ross, a blind player who spoke at our conference earlier, gave a simultaneous exhibition in Belfast. The Global Chess Festival in Budapest on 12 October has a fascinating programme on how visually impaired and deaf players train and compete.

Nowadays there are international associations for blind, for physically impaired and for deaf players. Each is a member in FIDE and represented in the Chess Olympiads with an international men´s and women’s team.

Just as there are more and more female only tournaments, there is also an increasing number of separate competitions for the players with handicaps. A few months ago the first World Championship for Physically Disabled took place in New Jersey. CNN produced a moving report. But maybe there are already too many separate competitions. The World Disabled Open, Youth and Cadet Championship that was scheduled in Cardiff for the week of our conference, has just been cancelled due to a lack of registrations.

Alessio Viviani, an amytrophia patient who cannot move a piece without an assistant, caused a sensation in Italy by winning the Open in Porto San Giorgio in 2015 ahead of several professionals. The Italian insists that he would not participate in a separate competition. This begs the question if resources should rather enable players with impairments to participate in mixed, open competitions and thereby increase their participation and visibility.

The ECU recently ran a workshop on Equal Opportunities in cooperation with FIDE´s DIS Commission in Thessaloniki, where guidelines for organisers, recommendations for federations and training needs were worked out. Inclusive Education is the focus of the latest edition of the ECU´s First Rank Newsletter.

We are looking for discussants for a Round Table on Inclusion and Equal Opportunities. We are also inviting contributions for a workshop on Chess for Children with Special Needs. Please write us at info@chessplus.net

Parallel Streams (and a bit of Overlap)

We have been asked about the structure of our conference. We have parallel streams throughout both conference days on our title theme “Chess and Female Empowerment” as well as on Chess in Education with a bit of overlap. Here is our planned schedule:

Saturday 30 November
9.30-11.00 Registration
11.00-12.45 Opening Plenary: Female Perspectives
12.45-14.00 Lunch
Book Presentation
14.00-16.00 World Café Debates
Round Table Inclusion and Equal Opportunity in Chess
Workshop
Software Presentations
16.00-16.30 Coffee
16.30-18.00 Parallel Workshops
18.30-20.30 Games on 8×8 Evening
Sunday 1 December
9.00-10.30 Parallel Workshops
                      Software Presentations 
10.30-11.00 Coffee
11.00-13.00 Keynotes
World Café Debates
Parallel Workshops
13.00-14.15  Lunch
14.15-15.30 Round Table The Woman Question in Chess
Parallel Workshops
15.30-16.00   Coffee
16.00-17.30 Parallel Workshops

This doesn´t mention the numerous side meetings that are informal or by invitation only nor the planned film screenings.

The world class action in the Grand Chess Tour final will start on the day after the conference on Monday, 2 December. If you participate yourself in the London Chess Classic, your playing schedule will allow you to attend a part of the conference on Saturday, 30 November, and most of it on Sunday, 1 December. Several bus lines run between the Irish Cultural Centre in Hammersmith and the Olympia Kensington. It is just under a mile or twenty minutes to walk. Considering that you won´t be able to attend the conference at full length, as a registered participant of the FIDE Open or Weekender you are eligible to attend the conference on both days with the purchase of one day ticket.

Please keep our call for contributors in mind contact us with your suggested presentation or debate topic.

Call for Contributions

The London Chess Conference (30 November and 1 December 2019) is looking for your contributions related to the theme of “Chess and Female Empowerment”. Don’t be shy to present or debate. You may contribute an article, a poster about your project, research or experience. We want to have a lively informed debate which give people the opportunity to embrace new ideas, make new contacts and develop new projects.

Workshops typically comprise 10-20 participants exploring a topic in detail. You may wish to contribute as a workshop chair or presenter. Potential workshops titles are:

  • Making clubs and competitions more welcoming (not only) for women and girls
  • Increasing the role of women in chess organisations
  • Empowering female teachers in school chess
  • The growth mindset in junior chess
  • Prejudice, sexism and how to fight it
  • Innovation and diversity in chess organisations
  • Project evaluation
  • Conducting surveys

Another cherished format of the London Chess Conference is the “World Café Debate”. All debates take place simultaneously in the main hall. Each debate is moderated by the same person. The participants will be invited at (30 minute) intervals to move along to another debate. Possible debate topics include:

  • Should girls have separate competitions?  
  • Should women-only titles (WFM, WIM, WGM) be abandoned?
  • Policy focus: decrease the performance gap or the participation gap?
  • Equal pay for woman players?

We are also planning two round tables with discussants and questions from the audience. Are you up to debate this:

  • One century of promoting females in chess: what have we learned?
  • Inclusion and equal opportunity in competitive chess

Please contribute your suggestions to us at conference@chessplus.net

Note that we already have several sessions lined up with speakers and debaters. The call for contributors does not detract from currently planned topics.

London Chess Conference 2019

Our 2019 Preview Video

7th Annual London Chess and Education Conference on 30 Nov – 1 Dec, Irish Cultural Centre, Hammersmith

The theme of the 7th Annual London Chess and Education Conference on 30 Nov – 1 Dec is “Chess and Female Empowerment”. The conference examines the involvement of women and girls in chess and presents insights into how to improve the gender balance. The conference will be of interest to women chess players, organisers and educators.  Primary and secondary school teachers will learn how to make chess a more engaging activity through its social and collaborative modes.  The conference will also provide ideas and initiatives for those striving to improve the engagement of women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. 

The Conference will present new findings from two major surveys on women and girls in chess.  A large study conducted by the European Chess Union presents statistics on women and girls in national federations throughout Europe. A study conducted through the US Chess Federation will provide qualitative insights into chess and gender issues. An analysis of online play in the Netherlands will provide details of how boys and girls compare.

The conference comprises plenary sessions interspersed with parallel streams comprising presentations, workshops, discussions, debates and demonstrations. Several speakers will relate their own personal experiences as a woman in a male environment whether playing, arbiting or organising. 

A wide range of issues will be covered including:

  • creating a safe and welcome environment for women   
  • successful women who played chess
  • why do girls give up chess?
  • how to make chess more accessible to women
  • challenges for women officials
  • lessons from other sports

Those expected to attend include:

  • Janton van Apeldoorn (NED)
  • Rita Atkins  (HUN)
  • Lorin d’Costa (ENG)
  • José Antonio Coleto Calderón (ESP)
  • James Conlon (ENG)
  • Julie Denning (ENG)
  • Alessandro Dominici (ITA)
  • Dr. Mette Eilstrup-Sangiovanni (ENG)
  • Chris Fegan (ENG)
  • John Foley (ENG)
  • Tania Folie (BEL)
  • Fernand Gobet (SUI)
  • Ljubica Lazarevic (SRB)
  • Alice O’Gorman (IRL)
  • Maureen Grimaud (USA)
  • José Manuel González Guillorme (ESP)
  • Jesper Hall (SWE)
  • Alexis Harakis (ENG)
  • Jovanka Houska (ENG)
  • Sarah Hurst (ENG)
  • Jo Hutchinson (ENG)
  • Mads Jacobsen (DEN)
  • Ilaha Kadimova (AZE)
  • Stefan Löffler (GER)
  • Smbat Lputyan (ARM)
  • Sean Marsh (ENG)
  • Carol Meyer (USA)
  • Etienne Mensch (FRA)
  • Jerry Nash (USA)
  • Vince Negri (ENG)
  • Mikkel Norgaard (DEN)
  • Brigitta Peszleg (HUN)
  • Marcel Pruijt (NED)
  • Sophia Rohde (USA)
  • Jonathan Rowson (SCO)
  • Agnieska Sapkowska (POL)
  • Vahan Sargsyan (ARM)
  • Pep Suarez (ESP)
  • Mark Szavin (HUN)
  • Malcolm Pein (ENG)
  • Mike Truran (ENG)

We will also continue our focus on chess in education with parallel sessions.

In the week which follows, 2nd-6th December, there will be professional teacher training courses at the venue certificated by the European Chess Union. The courses cover Teaching Chess in Primary School (ECU101) and Learning Mathematics through Chess (ECU102). Further details can be found here.

Registration  

The conference fee is £65 for one day and £95 for both days. Participants of the London Chess Classic Open or Week-ender can take part on both days with a one-day-ticket. Female members of the English Chess Federation are eligible for free entry by sending an email in advance to conference@chessplus.net with your membership number. 

Lead Sponsors

The event is lead sponsored by FIDEChess in Schools and Communities (CSC), the European Chess Union (ECU) and the English Chess Federation (ECF).

Photo from Michal Vrba

Videos and Presentations

Most presentations and videos from many of them are now available on our presentations page which we added in the menu. This will be continually updated as the remaining presentations are coming in. The videos and presentations are merged in a convenient way as you can see from this exemplary one:

We have also created a playlist of conference videos on youtube. There you also find accompanying summaries of the presentations. All thanks to our many contributors and to the fantastic efforts by our digilent and always helpful videographer Etienne Mensch who joined the conference team this year.

Etienne is Digital Director at a vocational training centre in Strasbourg. He is an International Master and experienced chess coach, among the talents he nurtured is Grandmaster Bilel Bellahcene. He was also Education Director of the French Chess Federation and managed live transmissions of several high level chess events.

Our conference videographer Etienne Mensch (photo: John Foley)

We wish everyone a merry festive time and all the best for 2019!


Which Workshops for You?

During the parallel sessions of the conference you will have a choice where to go to. Here are brief summaries of the workshops in chronological order.

Saturday afternoon

Chess in Education Strategy This two-part workshop picks up key issues from the first plenary session and addresses how strategic processes can be organised and communicated within organisations and towards stakeholders. (15-16 and 16.30-18)

Chess in Communities Chess projects that are serving social purposes in its immediate surroundings require a different outlook than competitive chess. Three project leaders share their challenges and provide inspiration. (15-16)

Chess in Prisons Chess has been a popular pasttime of prisoners for a long time. Recently it has been picked up as an intervention to educate inmates and young at-risk delinquents. Prison chess leaders come together to exchange experience and develop a joint research project. (16.30-18)

Sunday morning

Large Scale School Chess Events They are a corner stone of promoting and marketing school chess. Presentations on the UK Chess Challenge, Belaya Ladya, Linkes Alsterufer gegen rechtes Alsterufer, Schack4an and the K12 (Super)Nationals will elaborate what makes each of theses events special, and maybe why none has a conference attached to it yet. (9.30-11)

Business Development How can you put your school chess project or teaching business on firmer ground and make it more efficient? Neil Dietsch, who after a long corporate career is running school chess in Alabama, will conduct this hands-on workshop (9.30-11)

Book Presentation: The Learning Spiral Kevin Cripe, a retired teacher who is now running a chess project for disadvantaged kids in Panama, will present and discuss his new book on chess didactics. (10-11)

Teaching Coding and Computer Skills through Chess Strategy games, and chess in particular, provide a great pathway to introduce young students to coding and teach them other computer skills. Boris Raguet, a French teacher and teacher trainer, shows how this can be accomplished. He will be introduced by David Kramaley. (10-11)

Sunday afternoon

Early Years Chess Starting out on chess with preschoolers or first graders comes with special challenges but also with opportunities to use chess to promote basic numeracy, literacy and psycho motor skills. (13.45-15.15)

Making School Chess Research More Relevant Most studies of school chess have concentrated on cognitive benefits and simple comparisons with control groups of children that didn´t learn chess. While their results may be useful for marketing, different research questions and methods are required to improve the quality and efficacy of school chess. (13.45-15.15)

Promoting Social Skills through Chess Initially often targeted at mathematic and logic skills, those who teach chess in schools often find that social skills are promoted equally or even priorily. (13.45-15.15)

Workshops provide ample opportunity to answer questions, discuss and start cooperating

Pick Your Two Debates!

The saturday afternoon of the conference will start with a special debating format, the so-called „World Café“. Five interactive debates will be going on at thesame time. Each debate will be designated by a flipchart in adifferent part of the main hall. Each debate has one or two protagonists that will lead the conversation and engage those who join. After half an hour everyone but the protagonists will beinvited to change and join a different debate for the next thirty minutes. So you are supposed to pick two debates from these five on our plate this year:

Debating circles at a past London Chess Conference

Should after-school chess be taught by volunteers or by professionals? Boris Bruhn brought up this question which bugs many organisations as it has consequences on the quality assurance,trainings and support structure. What is the future of chess clubs? This question, presented by Vince Negri and Paul Barasi, arises inthe context of the relative boom of school chess at an earlier age. How should we relate to parents and teachers? These are the major stakeholders of school chess and the backdrop of the debate is a survey among parents and teachers that Graeme Gardiner has run in Australia. Kerry Turner, a consultant and academic who is far from being a chess activist, asks: Do schools teach the right subjects? What does it take to get the status of a subject? This is a goal, or at least hope, that many activists and officials are hedging.

The purpose of the debates is to exchange knowledge and to collect interesting arguments and perspectives on your debating question and to learn how aconversation on this question is evolving. All of the four debates mentioned so far are relevant for the Strategy workshops that will start later in theafternoon. The fifth debating theme is quite different: What cantable top computers add to the chess classroom? Is there a role for consumer electronics in today´s chess teaching environment? This is brought to you by Alexis Harakis and Stefan Löffler on behalf of theexhibitor Millennium Computers. Make your pick!

Presentation videos from the 2017 Conference

Psychologist Karel van Delft, a chess education expert from the Netherlands (Chess Talent), recorded several presentations from the conference. You can also follow the actual slides.

In alphabetical order:

Maurice Ashley: School Chess, Research and Curriculum
www.youtube.com/watch?v=SOA6UTfRU-I&feature=youtu.be

William Bart: Making School Chess Research Relevant
www.youtube.com/watch?v=bY9DmrduE-g&feature=youtu.be

Reinaldo Golmia Dante: Research
www.youtube.com/watch?v=MvqEv0aq-Ko&feature=youtu.be

Leontxo García: Chess Across Subjects
www.youtube.com/watch?v=ho1jSN1SwP8&feature=youtu.be

Fernand Gobet: Chess and Intelligence – Lessons for Scholastic Chess
www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hq6rbC4aiHU&feature=youtu.be

Jesper Hall: Does Scholastic Chess Need a Code of Conduct?
www.youtube.com/watch?v=ULU8AgaGFx4&feature=youtu.be

Mads Jacobsen: What is Scholastic Chess?
www.youtube.com/watch?v=jHnNGmEDE9c&feature=youtu.be

Ebenezer Joseph: Thinking Outside the Box – Enhancing Creativiy with Chess Instruction
www.youtube.com/watch?v=gmSlqVksqTQ&feature=youtu.be

Brian Kisida: School Chess, Research and Curriculum
www.youtube.com/watch?v=XoJaPMYcm4M&feature=youtu.be

Jakob Rathlev: What Everyone in Scholastic Chess Should Know about Evaluation
www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ix4bs5gRWD4&feature=youtu.be

Sunil Weeramantry: A Blended Learning Chess Course
www.youtube.com/watch?v=VYPCv8dIUq8&feature=youtu.be

 

Reminiscences

How time flies! The Didactics of Chess are well behind us, if still fresher in our memories than the previous three editions.

Beginnings were modest. The first London Chess Conference, back in 2013, could fit in one of the commentary rooms at the London Chess Classic. With a grand total of 15 speakers (distinguished though they were), the gathering had a decidedly cosy ambience. “Plenary workshop” was not a contradiction in terms. By the first afternoon, everyone had met everyone else. Forget cursory introductions: one would have had a long, stimulating conversation with every other delegate over the course of the weekend. Sessions ran consecutively, aministrative work was minimal, and the networking gathering was an affair so quiet and serene that many would entertain ideas of a quick game of chess. Those were simpler times.

Fast forward three years and we all found ourselves at an eight-room conference centre to discuss teaching chess with 150 delegates working in 25 countries of the world. The 4th London Chess Conference was by far the largest and most international ever gathering of educators, researchers, schoolteachers, coaches, organisers, civil servants and non-profit executives interested in how chess can be used as a force for driving educational attainment. Disappointment was universally voiced at having to choose between concurrent sessions, all equally excellent. But there was no alternative: who would have time to attend a fortnight-long conference? That is what it would have taken to run all talks, workshops, seminars, debates and panels consecutively.

The diversity of topics was staggering and the quality of sessions universally excellent. As has become a tradition, a competition was also held: this time for the best chess exercise involving collaborative problem solving. In the end, the judging panel could not decide between two very different entries, and awarded a shared first prize.

As is unavoidably the case with an event at such scale, there were organisational challenges, but we hope that they remained hidden behind the scenes. At the end of the day, it is not our work as organisers that made the Conference what it was, but the expertise of over a hundred unbelievably clever and dedicated delegates along with your love of chess, passion for education, and selfless enthusiasm for sharing your knowledge and experience.

Our job was gathering all of you together in one building; if we could do that, the event was guaranteed to be a success. We hope that everyone left London feeling as inspired as we certainly did.

From all of the organisers to all the attendees, thank you for making the 4th London Chess Conference so unforgettable.